Formulation and Evaluation of Hair gel containing Unani Medicine

 

Nitin A. Gaikwad*, Abhishek S. Pujari, Indrajeet V. Mane, Ganesh B. Vambhurkar, Pravin P. Honmane

Rajarambapu College of Pharmacy, Kasegaon, Dist – Sangli, Maharashtra, India – 415404.

*Corresponding Author E-mail: nitingaikwad2018@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT:

Gel formulation provides better application property and stability in comparison to cream and ointment. Topical gel drug administration is a localized drug delivery system anywhere in the body through ophthalmic, rectal, vaginal and skin as topical routes. Skin is one of the most extensive and readily accessible organs on human body for topical administration and is main route of topical drug delivery system. Topical application of drugs offers potential advantages of delivering the drug directly to the site of action and acting for an extended period of time. Topical gels are intended for skin application or to certain mucosal surfaces for local action or percutaneous penetration of medicament or for their emollient or protective action. Gels are evaluated by following parameters such as pH, homogeneity, grittiness drug content, viscosity, spreadability, extrudability, skin irritation studies, in-vitro release, in Stability.

 

KEYWORDS: Hair gel, Evaluation of gel, Brahmi, shikakai.

 

 


INTRODUCTION:

Topical delivery is an attractive route for local and systemic treatment. The delivery of drugs onto the skin is recognized as an effective means of therapy for local dermatologic diseases. It can penetrate deeper into skin and hence give better absorption[1]. Topical application has many advantages over the conventional dosage forms. In general, they are deemed more effective less toxic than conventional formulations due to the bilayer composition and structure. In the formulation of topical dosage forms, attempts are being made to utilize drug carriers that ensure adequate localization or penetration of the drug within or through the skin in order to enhance the local and minimize the systemic effects, or to ensure adequate percutaneous absorption[2].

 

Topical preparation avoids the GI-irritation, prevent the metabolism of drug in the liver and increase the bioavailability of the drug. Topical preparations give its action directly at the site of action[3].

 

A gel is a two-component, cross linked three-dimensional network consisting of structural materials interspersed by an adequate but proportionally large amount of liquid to form an infinite rigid network structure which immobilizes the liquid continuous phase within. The structural materials that form the gel network can be composed of inorganic particles or organic macromolecules, primarily polymers. Cross links can be formed via chemical or physical interactions. This leads to gel classification into chemical and physical gel systems, respectively. Chemical gels are associated with permanent covalent bonding while physical gels result from relatively weaker and reversible secondary intermolecular forces such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, dipole dipole interactions, Vander Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions[4]. The U.S.P. defines gels as a semisolid system consisting of dispersion made up of either small inorganic particle or large organic molecule enclosing and interpenetrated by liquid. Gels consist of two phase system in which inorganic particles are not dissolved but merely dispersed throughout the continuous phase and large organic particles are dissolved in the continuous phase, randomly coiled in the flexible chains[5].

 

Anatomy of Skin:

The skin is the largest organ of the body. Its large surface area in direct contact with the environment presents tremendous opportunities for drug delivery. The human skin is organized into two distinct layers, namely the epidermis and dermis directly beneath (Fig 1). The highly vascular dermis is made up of a connective tissue matrix containing the nerves, hair follicles, pilosebaceous units and sweat glands. The epidermis is avascular and its outermost layer, the stratum corneum, consists of keratin-rich, dead epidermal cells called corneocytes embedded within a lipid rich matrix. The stratum corneum forms the primary barrier for drug permeation especially to water-soluble compounds. Consequently, drug delivery across the stratum corneum has become the essence in the design of many dermal delivery systems [6].

 

Figure 1: Human skin

 

Structure of Gel:

The rigidity of a gel arises from the presence of a network formed by the interlinking of particles gelling agent. The nature of the particles and the type of force that is responsible for the linkages, which determines the structure of the network and the properties of gel. The individual particles of hydrophilic colloid may consist of either spherical or an isometric aggregates of small molecules, or single macromolecules. Possible arrangements of such particles in a gel network are shown in (fig.2). In linear macromolecules the network is comprised of entangled molecules, the point of contact between which may either be relatively small or consist of several molecules aligned in a crystalline order, as shown in Fig.2(c) and(d). The force of attraction responsible for the linkage between gelling agent particles may range from strong primary valencies, as in silicic acid gels, to weaker hydrogen bonds and vander waals forces. The weaker nature of these latter forces is indicated by the fact that a slight increase in temperature often causes liquefaction of gel[7].

 

PROPERTIES OF GELS:

Ideally, the gelling agent for pharmaceutical or cosmetic use should be inert, safe, and should not react with other formulation components. The gelling agent included in the preparation should produce a reasonable solid-like nature during storage that can be easily broken when subjected to shear forces generated by shaking the bottle, squeezing the tube, or during topical application. It should possess suitable anti-microbial to prevent from microbial attack. The topical gel should not be tacky. The ophthalmic gel should be sterile.

 

CHARACTERISTICS OF GELS:

A)    Swelling:

 When a gelling agent is kept in contact with liquid that solvates it, then an appreciable amount of liquid is taken up by the agent and the volume increases. This process is referred to as swelling. This phenomenon occurs as the solvent penetrates the matrix. Gel-gel interactions are replaced by gel solvent interactions. The degree of swelling depends on the number of linkages between individual molecules of gelling agent and on the strength of these linkages[8].

 

B)     Syneresis:

 Many gels often contract spontaneously on standing and exude some fluid medium. This effect is known as syneresis. The degree to which syneresis occurs, increases as the concentration of gelling agent decreases. The occurrence of syneresis indicates that the original gel was thermodynamically unstable. The mechanism of contraction has been related to the relaxation of elastic stress developed during the setting of the gels. As these stresses are relieved, the interstitial space available for the solvent is reduced, forcing the liquid out.

 

C)    Ageing:

Colloidal systems usually exhibit slow spontaneous aggregation. This process is referred to as ageing. In gels, ageing results in gradual formation of a denser network of the gelling agent.

 

D)    Structure:

The rigidity of a gel arises from the presence of a network formed by the interlinking of particles of the gelling agents. The nature of the particle and the stress, straightening them out and lessening the resistance to flow.

E) Rheology:

Solutions of the gelling agents and dispersion of flocculated solid are pseudo plastic i.e. exhibiting Non- Newtonian flow behavior, characterized by a decrease in viscosity with increase in shear rate. The tenuous structure of inorganic particles dispersed in water is disrupted by applied shear stress due to breaking down of interparticulate association, exhibiting a greater tendency to flow. Similarly, for macromolecules the applied shear stress aligns the molecules in the direction of Organic (single phase system)

 

USES:

·        As delivery systems for orally administered drugs.

·        To deliver topical drug applied directly to the skin, mucous membrane or the eye.

·        As long acting forms of drug injected intramuscularly.

·        As binders in tablet granulation, protective colloids in suspensions, thickeners in oral liquid and suppository bases.

·        In cosmetics like shampoos, fragrance products, dentifrices, skin and hair care preparations8.

 

Classification of Gels:

Gels can be classified based on colloidal phases, nature of solvent used, physical nature and rheological properties.

 

Based on colloidal phases:

They are classified into Inorganic (two phase system) type of force that is responsible for the linkages determine the structure of the network and the properties of the gel.

 

Two phase system:

If partial sizes of the dispersed phase are relatively large and form the three dimensional structure throughout gel, such a system consists of floccules of small particles rather than larger molecules and gel structure, in this system is not always stable. They must be thyrotrophic-forming semisolids on standing and become liquid on agitation.

 

Single-phase system:

These consist of large organic molecules existing on the twisted strands dissolved in a continuous phase. This larger organic molecule either natural or synthetic polymers are referred as gel formers, they tend to entangle with each other their random motion or bound together by Vander Waals forces.

 

Based on nature of solvent Hydro gels (water based):

Here they contain water as their continuous liquid phase E.g. betonies magma, Gelatin, cellulose derivatives, carpooler, and poloxamer gel.

Organic Gels (with a non-aqueous solvent):

These contain a non-aqueous solvent on their continuous phase. E.g. plastibase (low molecular wt. polyethylene dissolved in mineral oil and short Cooled) Olag (aerosol) gel and dispersion of metallic stearate in oils.

 

Xeroxes:

Solid gels with low solvent concentration are known as xerogels. These are produced by evaporation of solvent or freeze drying, leaving the gel framework behind on contact with fresh fluid, they swells and can be reconstituted. E.g. Tragacanth ribbons, acacia tear β-cyclodextrin, dry cellulose and polystyrene.

 

Based on rheological properties:

Usually gels exhibit non-Newtonian flow properties. They are classified into, a) Plastic gels b) Pseudo plastic gels c) Thixotropic gels.

 

Plastic gels:

E.g.- Bingham bodies, flocculated suspensions of Aluminum hydroxide exhibit a plastic flow and the plot of rheogram gives the yield value of the gels above which the elastic gel distorts and begins to flow.

 

Pseudo-plastic gels:

E.g.- Liquid dispersion of tragacanth, sodium alginate, Na CMC etc. exhibits pseudo-plastic flow. The viscosity of these gels decreases with increasing rate of shear, with no yield value. The rheogram results from a shearing action on the long chain molecules of the linear polymers. As the shearing stress is increased the disarranged molecules begin to align their long axis in the direction of flow with release of solvent from gel matrix.

 

Thixotropic gels:

The bonds between particles in these gels are very weak and can be broken down by shaking. The resulting solution will revert back to gel due to the particles colliding and linking together again (the reversible isothermal gel-sol-gel transformation). This occurs in colloidal system with nonspherical particles to build up a scaffold like structure. E.g.: Kaolin, bentonite and agar.

 

Based on physical nature:

Elastic gels: 

Gels of agar, pectin, Guar gum and alginates exhibit an elastic behavior. The fibrous molecules being linked at the point of junction by relatively weak bonds such as hydrogen bonds and dipole attraction. If the molecule possesses free–COOH group then additional bonding takes place by salt bridge of type–COO-X-COO between two adjacent strand networks. E.g.: Alginate and Carbapol.

 

 

Rigid gels:

This can be formed from macromolecule in which the framework linked by primary valance bond. E.g.: In silica gel, silic acid molecules are held by Si-O-Si-O bond to give a polymer structure possessing a network of pores

 

PREPARATION OF GELS:

Gels are normally in the industrial scale prepared under room temperature. However few of polymers need special treatment before processing. Gels can be prepared by following methods.

1.    Thermal changes

2.    Flocculation

3.    Chemical reaction

 

Thermal changes:

Solvated polymers (lipophilic colloids) when subjected to thermal changes causes gelatin. Many hydrogen formers are more soluble in hot than cold water. If the temperature is reducing, the degree of hydration is reduced and gelatin occurs. (Cooling of a concentrated hot solution will produce a gel). E.g.:- Gelatin, agar sodium oleate, guar gummed and cellulose derivatives etc. In contrast to this, some materials like cellulose ether have their water solubility to hydrogen bonding with the water. Raising the temperature of these solutions will disrupt the hydrogen bonding and reduced solubility, which will cause gelation. Hence this method cannot be adopted to prepare gels as a general method.

 

Flocculation:

Here gelation is produced by adding just sufficient quantity of salt to precipitate to produce age state but insufficient to bring about complete precipitation. It is necessary to ensure rapid mixing to avoid local high concentration of precipitant. E.g.: Solution of ethyl cellulose, polystyrene in benzene can be gelled by rapid mixing with suitable amounts of a non-solvent such as petroleum ether. The addition of salts to hydrophobic solution brings about coagulation and gelation is rarely observed. The gels formed by flocculation method are Thixotropic in behaviour. Hydrophilic colloids such as gelatin, proteins and acacia are only affected by high concentration of electrolytes, when the effect is to “salt out”, the colloidal and gelation doesn’t occur.

 

Chemical reaction:

In this method gel is produced by chemical interaction between the solute and solvent. E.g.: aluminium hydroxide gel can be prepared by interaction in aqueous solution of an aluminium salt and sodium carbonate, an increased concentration of reactants will produce a gel structure. Few other examples that involve chemical reaction between PVA, cyanoacrylates with glycidol ether (Glycidol), toluene diisocyanates (TDI), methane diphenyl isocyanine (MDI) hat cross-links the polymeric chain9.

 

Gel forming substances:

Polymers are used to give the structural network, which is essential for the preparation of gels. Gel forming polymers are classified as follows:

 

Natural polymer:

a Proteins i. Gelatin ii. Collagen b. Polysaccharides i. Alginic acid ii. Agar iii. Tragacanth iv. Sodium or Potassium carrageenan v. Pectin VI. Gellum Gum vii. Xanthin viii. Cassia tora ix. Guar Gum

 

Semisynthetic polymers:

Cellulose derivatives i. Hydroxyethyl cellulose ii. Methylcellulose iii. Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose iv. Hydroxypropyl cellulose v. Carboxymethyl cellulose

 

Synthetic polymers:

Carbomer i. Carbopol -941 ii. Carbopol -940 iii. Carbopol -934 b. Poloxamer c. polyvinyl alcohol d. Polyacrylamide e. Polyethylene and its co-polymers

 

Inorganic substances:

a. Bentonite b. Aluminium hydroxide

 

Surfactants:

a. Brij-96 b. Cetostearyl alcohol

 

Advantages of Hair Gel:

·        As delivery systems for orally administered drugs.

·        To deliver topical drug applied directly to the skin, mucous membrane or the eye.

·        As long acting forms of drug injected intramuscularly.

·        As binders in tablet granulation, protective colloids in suspensions, thickeners in oral liquid and suppository bases.

·        In cosmetics like shampoos, fragrance products, dentifrices, skin and hair care preparations.

 

OBJECTIVES:

Objectives of present work The objective of the present research study was to formulate, develop and optimize in situ gelling systems for ocular and periodontal therapeutic applications. To achieve these objectives the following specific aims of this research work were set.

1.      To formulate, develop and optimize ion sensitive and mucoadhesive/pH sensitive in situ gelling ocular drug delivery systems containing Olopatadine HC1 using Gellan gum (Gelrite) and Carbopol 934P in combination.

2.      To formulate, develop and optimize a novel mucoadhesive, syringeable drug delivery system for controlled delivery of Doxycycline hyclate to periodontal pocket based temperature sensitive in situ gelling systems.

3.      To optimize the ratio of gellan gum and carbopol 934P when used simultaneously to formulate an ideal sustained release ocular in situ gel forming drug delivery system using Box-Behnken Experimental Design.

4.      To characterize the in situ gelling systems and gels with respect to viscometric properties as a function of polymeric composition. (Gellan gum and Carbopol 934P, Chitosan and Poloxamer-407).

5.      To investigate the effect of Benzododecinium bromide as comeal permeability enhancer using its different concentration as per Box-Behnken Experimental Design.

6.       To optimize the ratio of chitosan and Poloxamer-407 when used simultaneously to formulate an ideal periodontal in situ gel forming drug delivery system using BoxBehnken Experimental Design.

7.      To investigate the effect of chitosan and PEG 600 on gelation temperature of poloxamer-407 using its different concentration as per Box-Behnken Experimental Design.

8.      To develop and optimize syringeable periodontal in situ gelling system with sufficient mechanical properties using chitosan, poloxamer-407 and PEG 600. 9. To compare the developed in situ gelling system with respective marketed preparation

 

Crude drug profile [9]

Acaciaconcinna

Synonyms: shikakai,reetah

Distribution: india

Part use: bark, leaves or pode

 

 

Figure 2: Acacia concinna

 

Kingdom : Plantae

Order : Fabales

Family : Mimosaceae

Genus: Acacia

Species : A. concinna

 

 

 

Chemical constituents:

In commercial extracts, whene plant is hydrolyzed it eyelds  lupeol, spnasterole,acacia acid ,and the  natural  suger  glucose ,  arabenose and rhamnose .it also contain hexaconcenol ,spinasteron ,oxalic acid, tartaric  acid , citric acid ,succinic acid ,ascorbic acid ,and the alkaloid scalyctomine and nicotine.

 

Uses:

anti dandruff, hyperpigmentation, jaundice, skin disorder, constipation.

 

Bacopamonnieri [10]

 

Synonyms: brahmi

 

Distribution: India, Nepal, shri lanka, china, pakisthan, Taiwan and Vietnam.

 

Part use: leaves whole herb.

 

Figure 3: Bacopa monnieri

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Order: lamiales

Family:Scrophulariaceae

Genus: Bacopa

Species: B. monnieria

 

Chemical constituents:

The best characterized compounds in bacopa monnieri are dammarane-type  triterpinoid saponin known as bacosides ,with  jujubogenin or  pseudojujubogenin  moieties as glyconine unites  .bacoside  comprise a family of 12 known analogs .other saponine  called  bacopasides 1 to 8 have been identified more resently the  alkaloids  brahmine, nicotine ,herpistine have been catalogeude ,along  with D-manitol ,apigenin ,hesaponine ,monniriaside  1-3 ,cucurbitacin and  lantinoside B .

 

Uses:

Antiinflamatry, Anti-pyretic, sedative, Anti-epileptic, Analgesic.

Experimental Work

Table 1: List of Drug and Excipients

Sr. No.

Drug/ Excipients/Chemical

1

Glycerine

2

Pectin

3

Carbomer

4

Citric Acid

5

Disodium EDTA

6

Methyl Paraben

7

Propyl Paraben

8

Colour

9

Purified Water

10

Sodium Hydroxide

11

Brahmi

12

Shikakai

 

Table 2: List of Equipment

Sr. No.

Equipment

1

Spreadability Apparatus

2

Brookfield Apparatus

3

pH Meter

 

Procedure:

1.      Weight Carbomer in absolutely dry condition and soke the carbomer in water for 24 hr.

2.      In 50% of water, dissolve citric acid and Disodium EDTA.

3.      Disperse Carbomer vigorously in above aqueous solution using spatula or over head stirrer for around 30 minutes.

4.      Keep aside the dispersed polymer solution for 30 minutes.

5.      Add mixture of glycerin, Isopropyl alcohol, methyl paraben, Propyl paraben and remaining water in to above mixture and mix it homogenously.

6.      Neutralize the above mixture using 10% NaOH, up to pH 7.

7.      Check the pH after each addition of NaOH using pH paper.

8.       (Apply same procedure for all batches.)

 

Table 3: Formulation Table

Sr. No

Ingredients

F1

F2

F3

F4

1

Pectin

0.5 gm

0.75 gm

1 gm

1.25 gm

2

Glycerin

1 ml

1 ml

1 ml

1 ml

3

Carbomer

6.3 mg

6.25 mg

6 mg

5.75 mg

4

Citric Acid

0.25 mg

0.25 mg

0.25 mg

0.25 mg

5

Disodium EDTA

0.025 mg

0.025 mg

0.025 mg

0.025 mg

6

Methyl Paraben

0.045 mg

0.045 mg

0.045 mg

0.045 mg

7

Propyl Paraben

0.005 mg

0.005 mg

0.005 mg

0.005 mg

8

Color

QS

QS

QS

QS

9

Purifide Water

QS

QS

QS

QS

10

Sodium Hydroxide

QS

QS

QS

QS

11

Brahmi

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

12

Shikakai

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

0.5 ml

 

 

 

EVALUATION OF TOPICAL GEL FORMULATION[11] [12]

Physical parameters such as color and appearance were checked.

 

Physical evaluation:

Table 4: physical evaluatin

Sr. No

Parameter

F1

F2

F3

F4

1

Color

Gelly Red

Gelly Red

Gelly Red

Gelly Red

2

Appearance

Clear

Clear

Clear

Clear

 

Measurement of pH:

 The pH of various gel formulations were determined by using digital pH meter. 2.5 gm of gel was accurately weighed and dispersed in 25 ml of distilled water and stored for two hours. The measurement of pH of each formulation was done.

 

Table 5: Measuerment of pH

Parameter

F1

F2

F3

F4

pH

5.8

6.2

6.8

5.9

 

Spreadability:

Spredability was determined by the apparatus which consists of a wooden block, which was provided by a pulley at one end. By this method spreadability was measured on the basis of slip and drag characteristics of gel. An excess of gel (about 2g) under study was placed on this ground slide. The gel was then sandwiched between this slide and another glass slide having the dimension of fixed ground slide and provided with the hook. A one kg weight was placed on the top of the two slides for 5 minutes to expel air and to nprovide a uniform film of the gel between the slides. Excess of the gel was scrapped off from the edges. The top plate was then subjected to pull of 80 gm. With help of string attached to the hook and the time (in second) required by the top slide to cover a distance of 7.5 cm be noted. A shorter interval indicates better spreadability was calculated using the following formula.

 

S= M × L/T

 

Where,

S = Spreadability,

M =Weight in the pan (tied to the upper slide)

L = length moved by the glass slide

T = Time (in sec) taken to separate the slide completely each other

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Table 6: Observation Table

Formulation

Weight moved on the Glass slide (M)

(Gm)

Length moved on the glass (L)

(Cm)

Time taken subperated slide completely from each other (T) (sec)

F1

80

6.5

21

F2

80

6.5

30

F3

80

6.5

58

F4

80

6.5

92

 


Calculations

Formula:

S= M × L / T

1)     For batch F1:

 

Where, M=80 gm

L= 6.5 cm

T= 21 Sec

S= M × L / T

= 80 × 6.5 / 21

S= 24.76

 

Table 7: Results

Parameter

F1

F2

F3

F4

Spreadability

24.76

17.33

8.96

5.65

 

Extrudability:

The gel formulation were filled in standard capped collapsible aluminium tubes and scaled by crimping to the end. The weight of tube was recorded and the tubes were placed between two glass slides and these were clamped. 500 gm weight was placed over the slides and then the cap was removed. The amount of extrded gel was collected and weighed. The percent of extruded gel was calculated as

 

1.      When it is greater than 90% then extrudability is excellent.

2.      When it is  greater than 80% then extrudability is good.

3.      When it is 70% then extrudability is fair.

 

Table 8: Observation table

Formulation

Weight of empty collapsible tube (gm)

Weight of empty collapsible tube + gel (gm)

Amount of removed gel

F1

2.50

15.95

13.07

F2

2.50

15.95

11.15

F3

2.50

15.95

9.88

F4

2.50

15.95

8.61

 

Viscocity:

Viscocities of gels were determined using Brookfield viscometer. Gel was tested for their rheological charactoristics at 25 0c using Brookfield viscometer (DV-III programmable Rheometer). The mesurement was made over the whole range of speed setting from 10 rpm to 100 rpm with 30 sec between 2 successive speeds and then in a descending orders.

       

Table 9: Observation table

Sr. No.

Formulation

Viscosity (cps) 50 rpm

1

F1

6043

2

F2

5351

3

F3

4630

4

F4

3845

 

Table 10: Result and conclusion

Formu

lation

ph

Viscosity

(cps)

Spreadibility

(g.cm/sec)

Extrudability

(%)

F1

5.8

6043

24.76

82

F2

6.2

5351

17.33

70

F3

6.8

4630

8.96

62

F4

5.9

3845

5.65

54

 

It was found that ph of all formulation in the range  of 5.8 to 6.8 that suits the skin ph this is the primary  requirement for good topical formulation.The average viscosity of gel is found between 3845-6043 cps and spreadibility  is found between 5.65 -24.76g.cm/sec and excrudablity of all baches (F1,F2,F3,F4).the F1bach pass nearly same with the standard paracine meter .From the above information we can say that formulation and parortion of pectin (7.5%)and cabomor  (63%)in F2formulation  for simpal hair gel containing unani medicine  such as Acaciaconcinna and  abacopamonnieri is good  for formulation .

 

Formulation of F2 batch

Table 11: Formulation of F2 batch

Sr. no

Ingredients

Formulation

1

Pectin

0.75gm

2

Glycerin

1ml

3

Carbomer

6.3 mg

4

Citric acid

0.25 mg

5

Disodium EDTA

0.025mg

6

Methyl paraben

0.045mg

7

Propyl paraben

0.005 mg

8

Colour

QS

9

Purified water

QS

10

Sodium hydroxide

QS

11

Brahmi

0.5ml

12

Shikakai

0.5 ml

 

 

RESULT AND CONCLUSION:

Table 12: Result and conclusion

Formulation

ph

Viscosity

(cps)

Spreadibility

(g.cm/sec)

Extrudability

(%)

F1

5.8

6043

24.76

82

F2

6.2

5351

17.33

70

F3

6.8

4630

8.96

62

F4

5.9

3845

5.65

54

 

 

It was found that ph of all formulation in the range of 5.8 to 6.8 that suits the skin ph this is the primary requirement for good topical formulation.The average viscosity of gel is found between 3845-6043 cps and spreadibility is found between 5.65 -24.76g.cm/sec and excrudablity of all baches (F1, F2, F3, F4).the F1bach pass nearly same with the standard paracine meter. From the above information we can say that formulation and parortion of pectin (7.5%) and cabomor (63%)in F2formulation  for simpal hair gel containing unani medicine  such as Acaciaconcinna and  abacopamonnieri is good  for formulation .

Formulation of F2 batch:

 

Table 13: Formulation of F2 Batch

Sr. no

Ingredients

Formulation

1

Pectin

0.75gm

2

Glycerin

1ml

3

Carbomer

6.3 mg

4

Citric acid

0.25 mg

5

Disodium EDTA

0.025mg

6

Methyl paraben

0.045mg

7

Propyl paraben

0.005 mg

8

Colour

QS

9

Purified water

QS

10

Sodium hydroxide

QS

11

Brahmi

0.5ml

12

Shikakai

0.5 ml

 

REFERENCES:

1.       https://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/Acacia concinna

2.       https://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/Bacopa monnieri

3.       Ansel HC, Loyd AV, Popovich NG. Pharmaceutical dosage form and delivery system,Williams and willikins  publications 2011,Edn.

4.       A Ishtiyaq: kulliyat –e-Asri,New public press  Delhi,43-83.1983.

5.       Abial-walid Mohammad bin Ahmad  bin Mohammad  bin Rushd ,Kitab AI-Kuliyat, Literary Research unit  lucknow ,CCRUM ,365,1965.

6.       Mikari BV, Mahadik KR, korde SA. Formulation and evaluation of topical liposomal gel for fluconazole, Indian Journal of pharmaceutical science. 2010; 44(4): 325.

7.       Dodov Glaves-Dodov, 5-Flurouracil in topical liposome gel for anticancer treatment formulation and evaluation, Maja Simonoska,Act apharm ,2003(53),241-250.

8.        Jain R, jain K, Setty CM, patel D. prepration and evaluation of topical gel Valdecoxib,International Journl of .pharm.Science and Research . 2010; 2(1): 51-54.

9.       Trivedi MN, Khemani A, Vachhani UD, Shah CP, Santani DD. Pharmacognostic, Phytochemical and Microbiological Studies of the Plants Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban and Withania somnifera (Linn.) Dunal Treasured as Intelligence Boost. Research J. Pharm. and Tech. 4(11): Nov. 2011; Page 1707-1713.

10.     Tripathi K, T Siva Kumar. Bacopa (Brahmi)-Open the Gate of Brahma-I. Research J. Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry 2010; 2(3): 181-184.

11.     Ravi Kumar, Jose j, Mahin MM, Raut R, Masurkar S, Narayana Swamy V.B. Formulation and Evaluation of Gels from Gum of Cissus refescence. Research J. Pharm. and Tech. 5(3): Mar.2012; Page 415-423.

12.     Rathod HS. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelucire Based Matrix Pellets Loaded with Antihypertensive Drug for Controlled Release. Research J. Science and Tech. 6(3): July- Sept., 2014; Page 156-172.

 

 

 

 

Received on 07.07.2018       Accepted on 20.08.2018     

© Asian Pharma Press All Right Reserved

Asian J. Pharm. Ana. 2018; 8(3): 129-136.

DOI: 10.5958/2231-5675.2018.00024.8